Join Us! We're Just Getting Started...

You’re seeing the changes. Summers that get longer and hotter every year. Reservoirs and rivers running dry in some places and flooding in others. Wildfires racing through tinder-dry forests. Crops stressed by extreme temperatures. Supercharged hurricanes, tornadoes and typhoons. Seasons that seem to be losing their rhythms.

The United Methodist Church can hasten the coming of a low-carbon world, one that ensures stability and sufficiency for all our communities. Here’s what we’re already doing:

We Bring Calm After the Storm. When extreme weather strikes, United Methodists bring order to chaos.

We Call the Powerful to Compassion.  When political leaders debate whether and how to limit climate change, United Methodists call them to lead with courage and humility.

We Take Bold Action. From Liberia to Minneapolis to the Philippines and more, United Methodists are launching major creation care ministries. 

There is something more we need to do. The United Methodist Church has a deep-seated financial interest in perpetuating the fossil fuel industry. We have more than $600 million dollars invested in top 200 coal, petroleum and natural gas companies--companies that are undermining our ministries around the world by exacerbating climate change. It is wrong to profit from these companies.

Fossil Free UMC is a movement of United Methodists calling our church to break its ties to the fossil fuel industry by passing legislation to add coal, petroleum and natural gas to the United Methodist Church’s ethical investment screens.

In 2015, Fossil Free UMC legislation earned the support of the General Board of Global Ministries along with 11 annual conferences. In response to our pressure, the General Board of Pension and Health Benefits instituted a guideline reducing coal investments. We are deepening and accelerating the global conversation on the intersection of financial and environmental stewardship in The United Methodist Church.

Now we need your help. Delegates from around the world will gather in Portland, OR in May 2016 to vote on legislation to cut the church's ties with the fossil fuel industry. 

We need volunteers to reach out to delegates before General Conference, support our outreach on social media, make public art and talk with delegates at General Conference. If you can volunteer, sign up here.

We need donors to support the work of this movement. Fossil Free UMC is a program of Caretakers of God's Creation, a non-profit creation care ministry for United Methodists. If you can give, donate here.

This tiny grassroots movement has a huge voice in the church because it is made up of United Methodists who are passionate about the church and about God's creation. Join us! We're just getting started.

Laudato Si': A Call to Action

Laudato Si': A Call to Action

Screening fossil fuels from our investments is a bold step, one that can help avert disaster for creation and the world’s poor. Pope Francis says, “The same mindset which stands in the way of making radical decisions to reverse the trend of global warming also stands in the way of achieving the goal of eliminating poverty.” Such decisions can only come out of radical love.

What the UM Pension Board Gets Wrong on Fossil Fuels

What the UM Pension Board Gets Wrong on Fossil Fuels

The General Board of Pension and Health Benefits recently published a pamphlet arguing that continuing to invest in and profit from the fossil fuel industry will bring wealth to the poor, contribute to global peace and stability, and effectively address the climate crisis. We so strongly disagree that we've put together a pamphlet of our own to counter their claims point-by-point. Here are some of the key issues United Methodists need to understand:

A Seat at the Table?

A Seat at the Table?

When churches consider divesting from companies for reasons of social and/or ecological responsibility, those who argue against divestment sometimes use the argument that we should not divest from a company or from an industry because doing so would cause us to lose our seat at the table with that company or that industry and make it more difficult to influence and effect change. The “seat at the table” argument is now being used to make the case against churches divesting from the fossil fuel industry.